Failing to Execute Ends the Plan

FAILURE to PLAN is PLANNING to FAIL

Many of us have heard this statement, or some variation thereof, numerous times.  This morning, I realized that failing to plan has never been my problem; I always have a plan.  Failing to execute, however, is the sin that does me in every time.

Last week, I wrote about having numerous “Day 1’s”and talked about part of the reason I have so many “Day 1” experiences is because I let one setback through me off my entire game.  As I reflected this morning, I realized that I can do better if I plan my executions of my plans better.

Let me explain:  I’ve partnered with another friend and we’re starting Dr. Ian Smith’s Super Shred program tomorrow.  I planned for the start of this program by purchasing and downloading the book to my iPad, looking at the needed groceries for Week 1, adding those to my grocery list, then picking up those groceries at the store yesterday.  I didn’t stop there.  I realized that the eating plan pretty much requires all meals/snacks to be consumed in a 12-hour window.  My 12-hour window doesn’t match the book, so I sketched out my day.  I didn’t stop there.  I looked at the recipes so I could create snack and meal options that worked for me, and when I realized one of my meals falls during my evening commute or after-school activities, I polled my Facebook friends for ways to make and store smoothies for later use.  I didn’t stop there.  I didn’t put the tomatoes I purchased in the refrigerator when I got home.  I turned the oven on, washed the tomatoes, halved them, and roasted them to make tomato soup.  While the tomatoes were roasting, I joined the SuperShredders group on Facebook.  While in there, I learned that the 4th day of Week 1 is mostly liquids.  Cool!  I got that covered with the tomato soup!

What’s your plan for this week?  This month?  This year?  Don’t procrastinate! Execute the moves needed to make your plan successful!  You may need to make some adjustments along the way, but you won’t know that if you never move the plan from paper to progression.

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